December 12, 2010

Random Acts of Kindness/Referrals – Together as Appreciation Marketing?

Previously, we discussed random acts of kindness and the role they play in Appreciation Marketing.  Last week, we also discussed the art of referrals and their role.

Can these two facets of Appreciation Marketing go together and show that you appreciate others?  Yes, these two can definitely exist together and can show that you appreciate others and what they do.

I regularly attend networking events where there are anywhere from 10 – 100 attendees.  I have met most of the regular attendees at these events and several of them for coffee chats outside the event.

I have received several compliments from people with whom I have met as to my professionalism, my passion for networking and helping others, as well as my personable attitude and drive for superb customer service.  More than once recently, I was pleased to hear someone, in public, praise my drive for networking with others and for my business specifically.

Do you have any idea how much these types of compliments make me feel?  Some of these people are my customers, and some are not.  Some of them are people of whom I am a customer, and some are not.  It does not matter who compliments you, the fact that they do, and sometimes publicly, is what matters.

Not only do you hear the compliment, and feel good as a result, but when others hear the public compliment, they will want to know more.  The compliment establishes you as a person who is well known, maybe as an expert on a subject, or perhaps as someone with whom others want to identify.

Maybe compliments will bring you more business; maybe they will only bring you more publicity.  Either way, you will benefit.  Either way, thank that person and try to return the compliment with another act of kindness, either for them or someone else.  After all, karma is what we all practice, isn’t it?

As a believer in Appreciation Marketing, you should actively look for opportunities to pass compliments to others, especially so that other event attendees can hear them.  If you believe that someone else has helped you, don’t wait for the facilitator of the event to ask for testimonials.  Give them freely without prompting.

If you are not in a position to pass on a testimonial, but you appreciate someone else’s support, advice, or kindness, pass on a compliment.  Give it directly to the person at the time you receive the assistance.  In addition, pass on a testimonial in public, where others can hear your words and realize that the recipient of the compliment may be someone with whom they should be acquainted.

There is another result of passing compliments or testimonials in public.  You, as the person who compliments others, will be come well known, and also known as someone who appreciates the efforts of others.  Better yet, you become someone with whom others may want to be associated.  Isn’t that one of the results of networking that we desire?

As always, I welcome your comments and questions.  If you would like to meet and chat about any concept of Appreciation Marketing, call me at 360-314-8691, or send me an email at Jim@SOC4Now.com with your thoughts.  Also, I appreciate your support and interest.

1 comment:

  1. I have learned second-hand compliments are really effective. Then the person knows they are absolutely true and great conversation starters.

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